Category Archives: Pastors

Jim Van Dyke, EPC “Father of the Church” and 3rd GA Moderator, dies at 89


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Jim and Rosemary Van Dyke

Dr. James Frazier “Jim” Van Dyke, Moderator of the 1983 General Assembly, died January 17 in his longtime home of Rome, Ga. He was 89. He was involved in the founding of the EPC and in 1992 was named one of five “Fathers of the Church.”

A native of Jewel Ridge, Va., Van Dyke was ordained in the Presbyterian Church U.S. (PCUS) in 1954 and served churches in Virginia and Florida before accepting the call to First Presbyterian Church of Rome, Ga., in 1974. He led the church into the EPC in 1982, and retired in 1992 following the longest pastorate in that congregation’s history.

Prior to his service as Moderator he was Stated Clerk of the EPC’s then-Presbytery of the South. He served a member of numerous boards, including King College (now University) in Bristol, Tenn; Thornwell Children’s Home in Clinton, S.C.; Montreat College in Montreat, N.C.; and Presbyterian College in Clinton, S.C. He also served on the Ministerial Advisory Board of Reformed Theological Seminary in Jackson, Miss., and many local charity and service organizations in Rome, including the Rotary Club, Red Cross, Salvation Army, and United Way. He also was a member of the 7th District Congressional Advisory Committee under Rep. Larry McDonald, who represented Georgia in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1975 until 1983.

Van Dyke was a graduate of King College in Bristol, Tenn. He earned a Master of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary in Richmond, Va., and a Master of Theology from Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, N.J. He also was awarded a Doctor of Divinity from King College.

He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Rosemary; daughter Miriam Van Dyke of Tucker, Ga.; son Joel Van Dyke of Greenville, S.C.; son and daughter-in-law John and Lisa Van Dyke of Norfolk, Va.; and six grandchildren.

A memorial worship service will be held at First Presbyterian Church in Rome, Ga., on January 20.

Click here for a full memorial notice.

First Presbyterian Church (Orlando, Fla.) ministry to homeless sees results, garners recognition


Lead Homelessness, a national initiative formed to fight the causes and effects of homelessness in the United States, has named David Swanson, Pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Orlando, one of the “11 Most Important Leaders Needed to Solve Homelessness in Orlando.” Others named to the list include Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer; Linda Gonzalez, Vice President of Social Responsibility for the Orlando Magic of the National Basketball Association (NBA); and Dr. Ben Carson, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

In a video presentation produced by Lead Homelessness, Swanson said that in his 13 years as pastor at the downtown Orlando church, “the primary need I have faced, since day one, has been how to deal with the countless numbers of homeless people that have been on our steps, that are in our church on Sunday mornings, that are coming seeking money, shelter, and all the different needs that they have. It has been a constant challenge.”

Under his leadership, First Presbyterian Church has spent $1.5 million serving the homeless population of Central Florida. However, he emphasized that while those efforts helped people, they did not address the systemic issues that caused homelessness. In a partnership with the Central Florida Regional Commission on Homelessness and the Lead Homelessness initiative, efforts are now focused on securing permanent supportive housing, in addition to meeting felt needs.

Jeff Jeremiah, EPC Stated Clerk, noted that homelessness in the United States is a ministry opportunity for every city-center church, and many suburban and rural congregations as well.

“The emphasis that First Orlando is involved with in helping secure housing for the homeless is having a major impact in a major city,” he said. “What this church is doing can be a real model for all our EPC city-center churches.”

Swanson emphasized that ministry to the homeless, while not always easy, can have long-term significance in many ways.

“One of the Church’s most effective witnesses is the manner in which she serves the larger community,” he said. “Being actively engaged with community leaders, civil servants, non-profit leaders, and elected officials builds positive relationships while also addressing larger social issues. It is often a winsome and positive way to intrepret the gospel to a city.  This has been the case for us as it has engaged us with the city of Orlando in the area of homelessness.”

U.S. Helsinki Commission hears pleas of Andrew Brunson’s daughter


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Andrew Brunson’s daughter Jacqueline Furnari is shown in a frame from the recorded video of the U.S. Helsinki Commission’s November 15 hearing on Turkey, “Prisoners of the Purge: The Victims of Turkey’s Failing Rule of Law.”

Jacqueline Furnari, daughter of Andrew Brunson, shared an emotional plea for the United States to continue efforts to secure the release of her father. She spoke to the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission, on November 15 in a hearing entitled “Prisoners of the Purge: The Victims of Turkey’s Failing Rule of Law.”

Andrew Brunson is an EPC teaching elder, arrested in Turkey in October 2016 and subsequently held on charges of espionage and terrorism. The hearing was held in the Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C.

“I know my dad and his character as only a daughter can,” she said, “and I know the charges against him are absurd. My father is not an armed terrorist trying to overthrow any government. My dad is a pastor who went to Wheaton College, then on to seminary and got a Ph.D. in New Testament. He has selflessly served Turkey for 24 years now. Everything in his life is centered on his faith. For my family, who has loved, served, and prayed for Turkey and its people, seeing these absurd charges brought against my father has been an extremely painful experience. The past year of our lives has been filled with uncertainty, worry, tears, and countless unanswered questions.”

In her five-and-a-half-minute testimony, Furnari recounted her childhood in Turkey.

“As I grew up, I saw my father pour himself into his work, and how willing he was to sacrifice his needs and wants for the sake of others. He believed, as I do, in a greater purpose in life and actively lived out his life with a purpose of showing people the love and grace of God.”

She also described her February 2017 wedding in a civil ceremony.

“We didn’t want to get married without my parents present, but because my husband is in the military, we could not postpone it. We had received my dad’s blessing, but neither of my parents were there. I will never get that moment back. For those of you who are fathers of daughters, I’m sure you would want to walk your daughter down the aisle. My father didn’t get that.”

Furnari concluded with an emotional plea to the Commission.

“My family has suffered greatly because of these absurd and false charges. Please make any and all efforts to secure my dad’s release and bring him home for Christmas. He’s been imprisoned falsely for far too long.”

Click here to view the 97-minute hearing in its entirety. Furnari’s testimony begins at 50:30, and she responds to questions at 1:10:34.

The Helsinki Commission consists of nine members from the U.S. Senate, nine from the House of Representatives, and one member each from the Departments of State, Defense, and Commerce.

Andrew Brunson’s daughter to address Helsinki Commission on November 15


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Andrew Brunson

Jacqueline Furnari, daughter of Andrew Brunson, will address the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCU) on Wednesday, November 15, in a hearing entitled “Prisoners of the Purge: The Victims of Turkey’s Failing Rule of Law.” The CSCU also is known as the U.S. Helsinki Commission, and is an independent agency of the Federal Government. Brunson is an EPC teaching elder, arrested in Turkey in October 2016 and subsequently held on charges of espionage and terrorism.

The hearing will be held at 9:30 a.m. in Room 124 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C., and will be webcast live at www.senate.gov/isvp/?type=live&comm=csce&filename=csce111517

“The efforts of the U.S. government to win the release of Andrew Brunson continues,” said Jeff Jeremiah, EPC Stated Clerk. “Vice President Pence met with Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim at the White House last week to discuss a number of issues between the two countries—including Andrew.”

Other panelists in Wednesday’s hearing are Jonathan R. Cohen, Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs of the U.S. Department of State; CeCe Heil, Executive Counsel for the American Center for Law and Justice; and Nate Schenkkan, Director of the Nations in Transit Project at the Freedom House, an independent watchdog organization dedicated to the expansion of freedom and democracy around the world.

The hearing will examine the factors contributing to the detention of American citizens, particularly Andrew and U.S. consulate employees in Turkey, as well as the judicial processes to which they have been subject. Furnari and Heil will testify about Andrew’s ongoing detention. Witnesses will also discuss the impact of these arrests on U.S.-Turkey relations and policy recommendations that could help secure their release.

The Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe is responsible for monitoring compliance with the Helsinki Accords and advancing comprehensive security through promotion of human rights, democracy, and economic, environmental, and military cooperation in 57 countries. The Commission consists of nine members from the U.S. Senate, nine from the House of Representatives, and one member each from the Departments of State, Defense, and Commerce.

Click here for more information.

Church Planters Retreat offers refresh and recharge


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Attendees of the EPC Church Planters Retreat enjoyed breakout sessions on a variety of topics, including fundraising, self-care, worship, and more.

As one of the EPC’s four strategic initiatives, church planting is a priority in the EPC. A significant aspect of supporting church planting is supporting and ministering to church planters. A key strategy in supporting EPC church planters is the annual Church Planters Retreat.

This year’s retreat was held October 25-27 at Cheyenne Mountain Resort in Colorado Springs, Colo. Nearly 50 EPC church planters, their spouses, and members of the Church Planting Team (CPT) joined presbytery leaders and others for three days of training and renewal that included peer networking, breakout and mentoring sessions, fellowship, prayer, and more.

Tom Ricks, CPT chair, explained that “church planting nuts-and-bolts” training sessions focused on topics such as fundraising, worship, self-care, and preaching in a start-up situation.

“Church planting is one of the hardest and loneliest endeavors of which I have ever been a part,” said James Daniels, pastor of Chelsea Presbyterian Church in suburban Birmingham, Ala. The church plant is not yet holding formal worship services, but is in the formation stage of hosting social events such as prayer breakfasts to build a local core group.

“The retreat came at a critical time in the process, and offered a beautiful balance of information and transformation,” Daniels added. “I’m entering back into my local community renewed and inspired for the days ahead.”

“This retreat was absolutely necessary,” said Brian Roskin, pastor of River City Church in St. Charles, Mo. “The topics were thoughtful and relevant for my current situation. I was able to connect with others doing the same thing, creating a network for me.”

Breakout sessions for spouses were led by Patty Robinson, wife of Shawn Robinson, founding pastor of Clayton Community Church in Clayton, Calif., and a CPT member. Her topic, “Engaging, Equipping, and Encouraging,” addressed how to navigate the call to be a church planter’s wife—including managing expectations and boundaries.

“Taking care of your relationship with God, knowing how and when to invest in the (church) plant, and protecting your marriage and family is what make the journey unique,” she said.

Another component of support for EPC church planters is a Church Planters’ Cohort, now in the planning phase with a launch goal of January 2018.

“The cohort will meet bi-monthly via FaceTime,” Ricks noted, “and cover topics essential to the first two years of church planting.” He added that “covenant triads” will provide opportunity for church planters to check in, support, and pray for each other.

Cohort leader Bart Garrett, pastor of Christ Church East Bay in Berkeley, Calif., reported that eleven church planters expressed interest during the retreat in this continuing training/support effort.

Jeff Jeremiah, EPC Stated Clerk, noted that the retreat could not happen without local church giving to Per Member Asking, since food and lodging are funded in the EPC budget.

“Commissioners to the 2017 General Assembly in Sacramento approved funding church planting—as well as the other strategic initiatives of church revitalization, effective biblical leadership, and global movement—in the EPC budget, so every church that participates in Per Member Asking is investing in EPC church planting.”

Ricks noted that many EPC presbyteries pay travel expenses for church planters and their spouses, “so they can attend virtually cost-free.”

“The Church Planting Team and I are grateful for the opportunity to help invest in and grow the next generation of EPC church planters,” Ricks said. “We’ve seen many churches come along side us as ‘Parents, Partners, and Patrons’ of church planting. Thank you to everyone who supports church planting. If you’re not yet involved but interested in learning more, let me know!”

Ricks can be contacted at tom@greentreechurch.com or 314-909-9197, ext. 1007.

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EPC church planters and their spouses at the 2017 Church Planters Retreat in Colorado Springs, Colo.

 

Imprisoned Andrew Brunson pens modern hymn, “Worthy of My All”


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Andrew Brunson holds a small cross given to him as a gift in a photo taken October 10 in the Turkish prison where he is being held. 

On November 3, Norine Brunson posted a recording of “Worthy of My All” to the Andrew and Norine Brunson Facebook page. The song was written this fall by EPC teaching elder Andrew Brunson while in prison in Turkey.

On the post, Norine commented, “This is a simple recording of Andrew’s song and his melody. Sung by a precious sister who has been here with us for over ten years. She is not a native English speaker as you can tell, but she is very special to us.”

Click here to listen.

Click here for a printable lead sheet in pdf format.

“What a blessing it would be for each of our EPC churches to incorporate this modern hymn into their worship services,” said Jeff Jeremiah, EPC Stated Clerk. “Norine calls it a ‘simple recording,’ but it’s clear that the depth of Andrew’s commitment to Christ flows through these incredibly moving lyrics.”

Brunson has been held since October 2016. At the time of his arrest, he was serving as pastor of Izmir Resurrection Church in the coastal city of Izmir. He faces charges of espionage, acquiring secret political and military information, attempting to destroy constitutional order and overthrowing the Turkish parliament, and membership in an armed terrorist organization.

 

Hope Church Memphis featured in The Gospel Coalition


HopeChurchTGCThe Gospel Coalition’s lead story on November 2, “How the Country’s Largest White Presbyterian Church Became Multiethnic,” tells the story of Hope Church in Cordova, Tenn. Planted in 1988 in a predominately white suburban area, within 20 years the congregation was the largest in Memphis—but with less than 1 percent of its 7,000 attendees African American.

The EPC’s largest congregation is now more than 20 percent African American, including the senior pastor, Rufus Smith.

Hope Church will host the 38th EPC General Assembly in June 2018.

Click here for the full story.

The Gospel Coalition is a network of evangelical churches in the Reformed tradition, and was founded by Tim Keller, founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City, and D.A. Carson, Research Professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Ill.